Well-being: Promoting Healthy Development

Well-being: Promoting Healthy Development

Our research helps us understand how to support cognitive, socio-emotional, and physical development across the lifespan.

Project Name Description
Family Interaction Study The Family Interaction Study involved parent-child and mother-father interactions to better understand the social bonds between parents and children and how parents' biology changes when family members engage with each other. 
Family Life Project The Family Life Project collected data from mothers of preschool children ages 3-5.5 years.  Participants take a survey about their and their child's experiences.  
Family Lifestyles Project The goal of the Family Lifestyles project was to examine the extent to which early appearing factors in children's environments - both health-related and psychosocial- are related to childhood overweight and obesity.  
Food for Families 'Food for Families' is a project designed to assess the feasibility and evaluate the impact of a backpack program which provides food for children over the weekend. Cultivate Food Rescue gathers donated food from area vendors (such as Venue ND and ND Athletics) that has been prepared, but never served. They then work with highly-trained volunteers to package it into six individual meals in an insulated backpack. The backpacks are then distributed to hundreds of food-insecure students through their schools. By providing an incentive for school attendance and eliminating hunger over the weekend, this program has the potential to improve school attendance and improve in-school behavior, therefore enhancing the children’s ability to learn.     
Get the Lead Out "Get the Lead Out" is a community-based project that aims to assess the effectiveness of a lead poisoning prevention program for families with young children who have low levels of lead exposure.  
Latino Families and Mental Health Study: The "Sequimos Adelante" Project The purpose of the Latino Families and Mental Health Study (also known as the "Seguimos Adelante" Project) is to learn more about the mental health of Mexican-origin adolescents and their parents. The investigators were interested in the various sources of stress and resilience among Mexican-origin youths and their families.  This program was launched in September 2013.
My Baby and Me The My Baby and Me project is a large scale, multi-site prevention project launched in 2003 designed to increase the occurrence of responsive and sensitive parenting in high-risk mothers of infants by helping them create new mental models of parenting and new parenting practices.  
Notre Dame Babies and Families This longitudinal study of the development of emotion regulation from infancy to toddlerhood began in 2001. Four major goals guided this study: 1) to examine the correlates and predictors of affect regulation from infancy to toddlerhood; 2) to examine the degree to which emotion regulatory patterns during early infancy are predictive of infant-parenting attachment and to what extent such relations are mediated or moderated by parent sensitivity; 3) to examine the extent to which emotion regulatory patterns and attachments during infancy predict later styles of emotion regulation and social competence during toddlerhood; and 4) to compare processes occurring for infant-mother dyads versus infant-father dyads.
Notre Dame Families & Babies Study (ND-FABS) This project aims to help mothers and families in their role as parents and as partners. Positive parenting and parent interactions help support the healthy functioning of babies as they develop.
Promoting Positive Parenting The Promoting Positive Parenting project was launched in 2007 to test the effectiveness of a cell-phone enhanced home visitation program in at-risk communities surrounding the University of Notre Dame and the University of Kansas' Juniper Gardens Children's Project in Kansas City, KS.
The Heart to Heart project The focus of the Heart to Heart project is to learn more about children's well-being and how mothers can best support their children. We are also interested in the biological rhythms of families. Prior research tells us that mothers play an important role in a child's development. We are testing a new program that tries to help mothers support their children by learning new ways to talk to them.
The SPARC Project (Supporting Parent-Adolescent Relationships and Communication) The Notre Dame SPARC Project is a program designed to support communication and strengthen relationships in families that include a child with an intellectual or developmental disability (IDD). In particular, the SPARC project is geared toward supporting parents and typically developing adolescent siblings of individuals with IDD by promoting effective communication and conflict resolution between couples and also between parents and their typically developing children. The goal of the study is to evaluate how best to support parents and typically developing siblings of individuals with IDD by improving communication and strengthening family relationships.